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How to Use Advanced Baseball Statistics to Your Advantage

Sabermetrics is something that’s been around for a long time, but it’s making a serious comeback. Seasoned punters have long used statistics to their advantage, but the field is still a bit too murky for beginners to fully grasp. It can be difficult to really gather up enough resources to make a decent bet based on the statistics offered to you. But what if you could clear the field and get something to work out to your advantage? There’s no need to fear statistics, after all, if you can learn how to interpret them profitably.

In order to understand why they’re profitable, you have to understand what they represent. If you’re a baseball fan, you’ll hear a few radio announcers and sports commenters talk about these statistics during the game.

Tracking performance of star players helps you figure out where you want to place your wagers. A strong team with strong statistics is going to give you a better return on your investment than a team with weak numbers. Yet you can’t just take numbers at face value. That wouldn’t be true analysis. You have to look at the context that wraps around those numbers. There’s a few different statistics that you can use to your advantage. Let’s run through those real quick.

1. WAR (Wins Above Replacement)

This statistic gets quoted quite a bit on television. It’s wins above replacement, a measurement of a player’s offense and defense abilities, relative to all of the actual players that could replace him. That’s an important distinction because not everyone can replace the player in question. You want to look at players with a decent WAR score as players that are going to bring value everywhere they go. So if a player gets traded, then you already know that they’ve got something interesting to offer the team. You may wish to adjust your wagers accordingly.

Baseball Statistics

2. BABIP (Batting Average on Balls in Play)

Batting average on balls in play is another measurement that gets quoted often. This measures how many of a batter’s “active” balls go towards hits, or which balls in play go against a pitcher for hits. It excludes homeruns. It’s used primarily to track the performance of pitchers.

3. WHIP (Walks Per Hits Pitched)

This is one of the statistics that is easily understood. You want to know how many walks a player actually creates based on the hits pitched. Pretty straightforward, compared to some of the other more esoteric statistics.

Baseball is filled with statistics. You could spend an entire day looking at teams based on statistics alone. In fact, there are many professional analysts that do exactly this. It may take you a while to really get this system down pat, but it’s definitely worth adding to your toolbelt if you’re really serious about baseball betting.